Kasich will tell you he wants to spend “more dollars in the classroom” and that he wants to “improve our schools” but today he attended the graduation ceremonies at ECOT – an online, for-profit charter school with one of the worst graduation rates in the state and an operator who is one of the biggest Republican donors in Ohio.

ECOT, The Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow, is the 21st largest “district” in the state of Ohio. As Greg pointed out last month, the state spent $59,978,866 on the school last year – millions of which seem to go directly into the pocket of William Lager, the schools founder.

Lager has returned a lot of that money – hundreds of thousands of dollars just last year! – directly into the campaign coffers of some of his biggest (typically Republican) supporters – including tens of thousands of dollars directly to Speaker of the House Speaker William Batchelder, Ohio Senate President Tom Niehaus and Chief Justice of the Ohio Supreme Court Maureen O’Connor.

Which might explain why this school has been gaining support among Ohio’s Republicans even though it has been sucking hundreds of millions in state funding away from Ohio’s public schools while failing Ohio’s students for nearly a decade.

In giving the commencement speech this year Kasich will join the ranks of Jeb Bush and Ohio Republican politicians Mark Wagoner, Gary Cates, Jim Petro and John Husted. All have spoken at past ECOT graduations and, not surprisingly, all have received contributions from Lager.

During the last campaign Kasich said he would push for State takeover of Cleveland Public Schools if they didn’t improve, but ECOT continues to have a lower graduation rate and a lower attendance rate than Cleveland Public Schools. Not only is Kasich not pushing for State takeover of ECOT – he’s promoting the school and of his party’s largest political donors – by speaking at their graduation.

If Kasich was serious about promoting the best schools and the best teachers, if Kasich was serious about putting more money back into the classroom, if Kasich was serious about doing the best for Ohio’s children, you really have to wonder why he is promoting a school like ECOT that:

  • Has had consistently flat or declining test scores for a nine year period
  • Has graduation rates of below 35% over that entire time (consistently 20 points lower than Cleveland Schools’ scores)
  • Has attendance rates that are consistently below the state average
  • Has student achievement scores that are significantly below state averages
  • Received 36% more in per pupil funding than the state average
  • Is run by an unlicensed superintendent and unlicensed assistant superintendent who are each being paid over $100,000 per year (above statewide averages)
  • Pays teachers are paid an average salary of $34,450, well below the state average of $55,812.

As a business, ECOT works great. They take in tons of cash (from the state), they make big profits for the founder, and they do it all while underpaying their teachers. As an educator, however, they kind of suck.

I guess we now know what Kasich thinks is important in a school.

Evangelize!
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  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Alex-Frenshon/1059143422 Alex Frenshon

    Actually, ECOT’s students enroll with the school after NOT SUCCEEDING in traditional public schools.  On average, ECOT students come to ECOT from these failing traditional public schools 2 entire grade levels behind their peers.  These are the same students who used to just fall through the cracks, but now have an additional last chance to earn their high school diploma.   

    Despite this, ECOT dramatically improves the performance of these at-risk students if you look at the indicators that matter the most.  On the state’s “value-added” measure, which actually measures how much students learn in one year, ECOT exceeds or meets the state’s expectations for student growth.  It’s no surprise that teachers unions have consistently tried to block value-added scores from being available  to parents to gauge teacher performance or to be used in performance evaluations.

    ECOT’s graduation rate comes as a result of ECOT enrolling students who were failing at their previous schools.  Say a student enrolls in ECOT in 11th grade from Cleveland or Columbus after failing a year there and therefore is a year behind their peers.  If ECOT gets that student back on track, and the student graduates in five total years in high school, that student counts as a failure on ECOT’s graduation rate — I know, it’s completely ridiculous, isn’t it?

    ECOT actually HELPS traditional big 8 urban district graduation rates by absorbing their failing students and helping the students succeed — and doesn’t get to count them on their graduation rate.  Even though ECOT is smaller than the districts of Youngstown, Akron, Toledo, Dayton, Canton, the school has more graduates each year than these entire districts, even though the ridiculous state- calculated grad rate is lower.  

    About funding — When you look at the entire amount tax-payers spend for schools including the cost to local taxpayers, which is what anyone really cares about, ECOT and other charters cost taxpayers only 46% what the Big 8′s cost them and 60% of the average cost to taxpayers for all districts in the state.  If you only look at the state share like Greg and that Innovation Ohio report did, you’re only looking at one piece of the taxpayer puzzle.  ECOT and other charters are a very good deal for taxpayers.  ECOT serves the a similar student population that Columbus, Cleveland and Dayton do, improves their performance on state tests and graduates a higher percentage of these students than the Big 8s.  When looking at the entire amount of taxpayer money including state AND local dollars, ECOT spends around $6000 per student and they spend about $12,000.  ECOT and other charters do not receive a dime of local taxpayer money and rely only on the state share.

    To use only the state share is intentionally misleading — something someone would only do if they were desperate to take the attention away from the increasing amounts of total taxpayer money being thrown at traditional schools and into the pockets of teachers unions for years.  (Um, how much have unions given to democratic candidates, by the way?)

    Say what you will about ECOT, which is a NON-PROFIT and PUBLIC school, but the school is growing faster than any other district or school in the state because it meets the demands of students and parents and has successful educational program that focuses on improving student performance.  ECOT also serves groups of students that just can’t be educated anywhere else — bed-ridden students with severe health issues, students with social disorders, students who have to work full-time during the day to support their families, teenage mothers and pregnant teens, and students who have been victims of extreme violence in schools like rape and sexual assault and extreme bullying.

    ECOT is not right for most students — traditional public schools are —  but there IS a place for the school in Ohio’s public education system.  These purely politically-based attacks are an insult to the 500 highly qualified teaching professionals who work at ECOT and who are proudly serving one of the most at-risk student populations in the state.

  • Annekarima

    It is ok, Joseph.  Repubs like to think Bobby Jindal is untouchable too but his armor is cracking.  Just google “Jindal health insurance scandal” and see what pops up – no pun intended.

  • Sp. Ed. Teacher

    I have students leave my classroom to go to “computer school”.  They have told me (and this is the truth) that their mom does the work.  One girl says her phys.ed class consisted of her walking around Walmart with her friends.  These are truly the students who are not cut out for traditional schooling.  Their grades are bad and they are failing, so they leave.  We also lost one because it’s against school policy to have your face pierced in multiple places.  I can’t get past the fact that they have ALL indicated that Mom does the work.  They log on and then go back to bed.  A year later, they re-enroll in public school and are even further behind.  Go figure.

  • Xx

     Based on what you wrote Alex, it seems as if ECOT isn’t cutting the mustard for the students you say it is trying to help, it is just throwing more money at the problem with the additional overhead of high dollar managers, poor pay for the teachers and the expectation that the students who have already failed at traditional education will some how succeed by putting them in front of technology that might actually make it harder for them to learn. Wouldn’t we be better off to stop wasting the money spent on  management
    of these schools and just have a program, run by the current school districts, to actually help the kids who
    fall through the cracks?

    All this just really drives home the point that the Republican agenda is not about educating the kids, it is about killing public schools.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Alex-Frenshon/1059143422 Alex Frenshon

    Thanks for your response.  I know it’s probably a lost cause on here, but I promise you that I normally support what Plunderbund usually covers — you guys are just wrong on this one. 

    Two things, as I wrote:
    –It costs taxpayers LESS money for charters like ECOT — not more money.  Anyone telling you differently is being intentionally misleading.–ECOT has the evidence of success with its at-risk students — exceeding the state’s expectations for how much a student actually learns in a year (the value-added measure) more than comparable districts (the Big 8s) and by graduating a larger percentage of its high school students than the Big 8 districts.

    –It would NOT be better to “just have a program run by the current school”  These are the districts where students are failing and enrolling in schools like ECOT in droves. (Besides, nothing is stopping them from offering their own online courses to compete.  They have MORE money per pupil to do so than charter schools.  They’ve actually tried to do this, but have not been successful so far)

    It’s not about any Republican or Democratic agenda.  Most of the students served by ECOT and charters and the teachers ARE democrats.  It’s about giving other options in public education to kids and families who don’t have many options.  We’re sorry that it threatens the teachers union, but that shouldn’t be the concern of educators  – We should be focused on educating students who are the toughest to educate.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Alex-Frenshon/1059143422 Alex Frenshon

    The evidence simply does not support that students do not do their own work at a  “computer school”  (What are traditional schools — “Book and paper school?”)  

    We are a school with real teachers, real students, real counselors, etc.  The technology is just a way to deliver instruction for our teachers.  

    Students who don’t do their work at ECOT are easily found out by our teachers based on their  professional judgement and their relationship to the individual learner.  Do you know when a kid’s parents do their homework or a science project at a traditional school?  Of course you do, because of your professional experience and what you know about a student.  It’s the same at ECOT.Our teaching professionals, who critics of the school continue to disrespect, actually get to know their students on a personal level through one-on-one sessions and lectures and know what level of work their students are capable of.  

    Also, who are you as a school to judge a student for facial piercings?  I don’t blame that student for leaving at all.  We treat everyone equally and respect our students regardless of their appearance, race, sexual orientation, or anything else.

  • Greg Mild

    If you’re going to post a comment, don’t fill it it will bullshit.  It annoys me to have to correct you in another lengthy post.

    First, the choice to specifically use the state funding amount was a result of the legislature doing the same.  All of the rhetoric surrounding SB5 and the budget bill focuses on the the cost of schools to state taxpayers.  As you might know, local and federal funding for school districts is, quite frankly, none of the state’s business.  Local districts that choose to spend more through property taxes are actually punished by the state in the form of decreased state funding.  Additionally, charters are funded at 2.5 times the amount of local districts as defined by the state’s own funding formula, immediately creating state funding inequities regardless of performance.

    Second, you selectively ignored the $14,000,000+ that ECOT received in federal dollars, the ON TOP OF the $59,978,866 in state funding.  And you have the nerve to say that charters “do not receive a dime of local taxpayer money and rely only on the state share?”  Who do you think is paying those taxes if not Ohio citizens?  Call them local, call them state, call them federal, I know that I qualify in all three categories.  So DO NOT try and imply that my tax dollars have nothing to do with ECOT and other failing charters.  Those dollars are MY tax dollars that could be helping to fund programs in MY local school district instead of funding chronically failing charter schools.

    Third, the graduation rate at ECOT is actually artificially HIGHER because of their enrollment practices.  ECOT has the same number of student withdrawals (3,955) in the HS grades as Canton, Dayton, and Youngstown combined, despite having 30% of the overall student enrollment.  That’s called scrubbing the rosters, Alex.  

    Fourth, I really don’t have any beef with the parents or students who are misled into believing that this is an appropriate learning institution for all students.  I understand the frustration of parents who are struggling with their children and are looking for a quick fix.  Along comes this school that promises to make everything better, provides a flexible schedule, eliminates the need to have you or your child interact in the real world with real adults to solve a real problem.  Sounds almost too good to be true.  Well, hiding out at home in front of a computer screen does not help to address real problems.  Are there students with serious medical concerns that benefit from a computer-based education?  Absolutely.  So how about the state relaxes restrictions on public school districts to make it easier for them to meet these special needs instead of turning over the control to a predatory profiteer like Lager?

    Finally, my real beef.  The money.  Read my earlier post again, Alex, and understand that I’m not upset by the students, their parents, or the teachers (456 education-professionals, 427 listed as teachers).  I am livid at the blind eye turned to William Lager’s money-making schemes that are nothing short of legislatively-endorsed money laundering.  I’m livid that those state and federal dollars are NOT going into the educational setting, but are instead being grossly re-directed at the administrative level into the pockets of William Lager.  (Remember that Kasich’s biggest complaint about school funding was administrative costs.)

    So DON’T YOU DARE call this sham of an institution a non-profit school.  William Lager is profiting hand-over-fist with OUR taxpayer dollars.  Purely politically-based attack?  I guess that depends on your definition.  Do you mean that the attack exists solely to identify an injustice that has it’s roots in partisan politics, cronyism, back-door deals, campaign donations (both personal and corporate – see IQ Innovations’ $153,649.19 donation to Republican Governors Association on 5/19/10),  and profiteering at the expense of taxpayers across the entire state?  You can call that whatever you want, I really don’t care.  The success of a few ECOT students is wonderful and should be celebrated.  The failure of the vast majority should be called what it is — wrong.

  • Greg Mild

    I was just thinking the lost cause part myself.  You might have overreached when you claim that ECOT is “exceeding” the state’s expectations.  I could only agree with you if you are implying that the state has low expectations.

    Here are the value-added scores from 09-10 for all grades (with approx. student count).  Not sure how this chart will actually turn out when posted.

    District          Student Count          V-A Gain          Classification      
    Akron                 7,847                               -0.4                       Red 
    Canton               3,319                                -0.3                       Red 
    Cincinnati        10,238                               0.8                       Green 
    Cleveland         13,952                                 1                          Green 
    Columbus         16,541                              -0.7                      Red 
    Dayton              4,872                                -0.2                       Yellow 
    Toledo               7,624                                -0.3                      Red 
    Y’town               1,989                                 -0.9                      Red  
    ECOT                   899                                     0.0                      Yellow

    So, ECOT’s gain is actually EXACTLY what is expected according to the state’s value-added data for 09-10 for that absurdly low number of tested students.  I do have a question — for a school that is same size as Canton and larger than Youngstown, where are all the students who should be taking these tests?  That would be connected to the withdrawal rates for MS students at ECOT be 2-4x higher than Canton, would it?

    Alex — don’t accuse someone of misrepresenting data and then misrepresent data in the very same post.

  • Annekarima

    Greg, great job. Thankyou for all the info and for hanging in there.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Alex-Frenshon/1059143422 Alex Frenshon

    Look at the two years prior to that and you will see ECOT getting two greens and last year, you’re right, ECOT only “met” the expected gains in student performance.  Still, as your chart correctly shows, ECOT still beat FIVE of the Big 8 districts.  You have a lot of nerve to post that value added chart!  Are you blind to the fact that FIVE of the Big 8 Districts are making lower than expected gains in student performance over a year?!

    The reason a low number of students count for the report card is because they come to ECOT in mid-year because they just can’t stomach going to their schools any longer, but it is certainly a representative group and valid for your cited purposes. We test 98% of all enrolled students. 

    I don’t have the time today to debate your ridiculous posts and, like I said it is a lost cause unfortunately because of your idea that ECOT and charters = Republican agena.  This is not a Republican/Democrat issue!  (Ask President Obama or Bill Clinton what they think about charters, btw), but the bottom line is: 

    ECOT spends 60% of the taxpayer dollars (only 46% of Big 8s)  and (as noted in the chart you posted) improve students more than their counterparts in traditional public schools.  That is the only argument needed for this discussion. 

    Our parents make informed decisions to enroll in our school because their current environment is not working for them.  How dare you imply that they can’t make good decisions for themselves!  I suppose academics like you should sit back and tell them all the things that are good for them.  For shame.  Have a good day and get out and enjoy this nice weather!

  • Greg Mild

    Yea, it takes a lot of nerve to post accurate facts.

    So I understand your claim about students transferring in, but why are so many more continually transferring out?

    And the value-added?  As you may well know when discussing the urbans, no one gives a shit about anything except the most recent year’s data — INCLUDING the budget legislation.  If you want to compare yourself to the big districts, you have to be willing to compare everything.  What’s the breakdown of districts or counties for where your ECOT students come from?

    And does your silence about your boss’s financial wranglings mean you support his fleecing of taxpayers?

  • Necessity

          Congratulations, ECOT graduates!  I sincerely hope you have been prepared to function with live people to whom you must answer and not only a computer screen behind which to work.  There is a lot to be said for societal skills and success in gainful employment.
          As a note to a comment far above, many Ohio districts do indeed offer these same services without the additional price tag of a management company.  They are successful, accountable, and rarely cost the taxpayer more than what is being spent on an average students within the district.       

  • Necessity

          Congratulations, ECOT graduates!  I sincerely hope you have been prepared to function with live people to whom you must answer and not only a computer screen behind which to work.  There is a lot to be said for societal skills and success in gainful employment.
          As a note to a comment far above, many Ohio districts do indeed offer these same services without the additional price tag of a management company.  They are successful, accountable, and rarely cost the taxpayer more than what is being spent on an average students within the district.       

  • Necessity

          Congratulations, ECOT graduates!  I sincerely hope you have been prepared to function with live people to whom you must answer and not only a computer screen behind which to work.  There is a lot to be said for societal skills and success in gainful employment.
          As a note to a comment far above, many Ohio districts do indeed offer these same services without the additional price tag of a management company.  They are successful, accountable, and rarely cost the taxpayer more than what is being spent on an average students within the district.       

  • Necessity

     Pinkdubeck, please remind us why children cannot learn morals and religion from their parents/guardians.  The state has standards of which teachers must meet and have included a citizenship group of standards in Social Studies.  You can continue thanking Governor Kasich, who may not have an inkling of the operations of a public school district and who could certainly benefit from more socialization which is not self-serving.  Meanwhile, you seem to make inaccurate attacks regarding issues that should be repaired at home and/or within the government.      You seem to have a strong opinion regarding these topics which you mentioned.  I could not access your email address, thus I am posting this here.  In order to get your point across clearly and concisely, please consider the following for your future reference:
    - Quotations should be used properly.  The general format is below.
    (unquoted text) (space) (beginning quotation mark) (quote) (punctuation) (end quote)
    -”High school” is not a proper noun and should not be capitalized as such.  It is capitalized here as the beginning of the sentence.  It would be capitalized if you wrote of a specific high school.
    -Spacing should be single within a sentence and doubled between sentences.
    -While your point is generally understandable you do have some areas of confusion.  For example, you are thanking Governor Kasich (notice the spelling) in one sentence and accusing him of taking God out of public schools in the next.  I am sure that is not what you meant to write.  However, I am sure you did not mean to imply that Plunderbund is responsible for the separation of church and state.  
    -A similar confusion is creating when you mention that you were impressed with the speakers AND what they said.  
    -The over-usage of punctuation and capitalization does not make a point clearer.
    -When using “May the Lord our God in Heaven bless ” separate it as “May the Lord, our God in Heaven, bless. . .”
    -”Morales” spelled correctly is “morals.”
          I would be willing to help you practice improving writing at your convenience.  It is what I do.  I am a public school teacher.  

  • Necessity

     Pinkdubeck, please remind us why children cannot learn morals and religion from their parents/guardians.  The state has standards of which teachers must meet and have included a citizenship group of standards in Social Studies.  You can continue thanking Governor Kasich, who may not have an inkling of the operations of a public school district and who could certainly benefit from more socialization which is not self-serving.  Meanwhile, you seem to make inaccurate attacks regarding issues that should be repaired at home and/or within the government.      You seem to have a strong opinion regarding these topics which you mentioned.  I could not access your email address, thus I am posting this here.  In order to get your point across clearly and concisely, please consider the following for your future reference:
    - Quotations should be used properly.  The general format is below.
    (unquoted text) (space) (beginning quotation mark) (quote) (punctuation) (end quote)
    -”High school” is not a proper noun and should not be capitalized as such.  It is capitalized here as the beginning of the sentence.  It would be capitalized if you wrote of a specific high school.
    -Spacing should be single within a sentence and doubled between sentences.
    -While your point is generally understandable you do have some areas of confusion.  For example, you are thanking Governor Kasich (notice the spelling) in one sentence and accusing him of taking God out of public schools in the next.  I am sure that is not what you meant to write.  However, I am sure you did not mean to imply that Plunderbund is responsible for the separation of church and state.  
    -A similar confusion is creating when you mention that you were impressed with the speakers AND what they said.  
    -The over-usage of punctuation and capitalization does not make a point clearer.
    -When using “May the Lord our God in Heaven bless ” separate it as “May the Lord, our God in Heaven, bless. . .”
    -”Morales” spelled correctly is “morals.”
          I would be willing to help you practice improving writing at your convenience.  It is what I do.  I am a public school teacher.  

  • Necessity

     Pinkdubeck, please remind us why children cannot learn morals and religion from their parents/guardians.  The state has standards of which teachers must meet and have included a citizenship group of standards in Social Studies.  You can continue thanking Governor Kasich, who may not have an inkling of the operations of a public school district and who could certainly benefit from more socialization which is not self-serving.  Meanwhile, you seem to make inaccurate attacks regarding issues that should be repaired at home and/or within the government.      You seem to have a strong opinion regarding these topics which you mentioned.  I could not access your email address, thus I am posting this here.  In order to get your point across clearly and concisely, please consider the following for your future reference:
    - Quotations should be used properly.  The general format is below.
    (unquoted text) (space) (beginning quotation mark) (quote) (punctuation) (end quote)
    -”High school” is not a proper noun and should not be capitalized as such.  It is capitalized here as the beginning of the sentence.  It would be capitalized if you wrote of a specific high school.
    -Spacing should be single within a sentence and doubled between sentences.
    -While your point is generally understandable you do have some areas of confusion.  For example, you are thanking Governor Kasich (notice the spelling) in one sentence and accusing him of taking God out of public schools in the next.  I am sure that is not what you meant to write.  However, I am sure you did not mean to imply that Plunderbund is responsible for the separation of church and state.  
    -A similar confusion is creating when you mention that you were impressed with the speakers AND what they said.  
    -The over-usage of punctuation and capitalization does not make a point clearer.
    -When using “May the Lord our God in Heaven bless ” separate it as “May the Lord, our God in Heaven, bless. . .”
    -”Morales” spelled correctly is “morals.”
          I would be willing to help you practice improving writing at your convenience.  It is what I do.  I am a public school teacher.  

  • http://www.plunderbund.com Eric

    Hereby nominated for comment of the month!

  • Tim M

    Nice job, Greg. Glad you are here to set things straight.

    I just loved Alex’s back-tracking and rushing for an excuse in his comment:

    “The reason a low number of students count for the report card is because they come to ECOT in mid-year because they just can’t stomach going to their schools any longer, but it is certainly a representative group and valid for your cited purposes. We test 98% of all enrolled students.”

    And his comment:

    “I don’t have the time today to debate your ridiculous posts” … meaning, you’ve won, I’ve got to get out here.

    BTW – I’ve seen an online school up close in operation. It was one where the kids actually go to a place (“school”) and take all of their classes by computer. It was very strange – - young kids sitting in these cubicals, no social interactions. The cublicals were bare except for the computers the kids were working on. They looked like cows sitting in stables and the kids when they looked at you looked very lonely or had very expressionless faces. It was very weird and it got me thinking that this might not be the way to go with education. I was touring it as a potential donor to the school.

  • Anonymous

    Pinkdubeck: either a proud graduate of an “e” school or a master satirist! Hopefully he/she will try some actual “education” one day.

  • Annekarima

    MORALES – Hmmmm……would that be Roy Morales, republican for congress, TX 29th District??  Geez…you walked right into that one.

  • gmild

    Donna — I’m going to come straight out and thank you for your comments.  You seem to be the only one to read both the article AND the comments before replying.  I hope your son is able to remain healthy for a long time and experiences great success in the future.

    I’ll speak only for me on this, and I think you already understood my perspective from the earlier comments and my previous post that was critical of ECOT.  I have absolutely no ill feelings toward the students nor the teachers of ECOT and consider both populations to be trying to further their personal and professional futures.  While I do not agree that an online school should be considered as an acceptable first alternative to a traditional (i.e., classroom) setting, I do agree with your clear points that it can provide a viable alternative to students who find themselves in circumstances where the only other option would be to drop out or hire a personal tutor/teacher at a great expense.
    That being said, my huge complaint about ECOT is the double standard they have been allowed to follow for many years as they continue to engage in questionable financial practices, the school’s operator retains huge amounts of public money, reinvests other large amounts in his other personal enterprises, all while remaining, per the Ohio Department of Education’s own reporting system, a failing school since it opened.  Does this mean that there are no successful children?  Of course not.  Low performing schools have high-achieving individuals quite frequently.  But it does mean that when compared to the oft-criticized large urban schools, ECOT ranks poorly in many measures, most notably graduation rate.

    But in the current climate, when charter school accountability is lowering and public school districts are under greater scrutiny; when we are constantly reminded that charter schools ARE public schools (except for the scrutiny part); when “precious” state tax dollars are redirected into the coffers of wealthy campaign donors with poor track records; and when a public school district that might have obtained the ECOT results only through an experimental model would have been permanently logged off; I have a problem with the system.

    Donna — again, I hope becomes easier for your family in the near future, and I hope your son enjoys getting back into a “real” school (just teasing).

  • Cmdrjan

    LOL!  That’s telling him or her, especially your words “I would be willing to help you practice improving writing at your
    convenience.  It is what I do.  I am a public school teacher.”  That says it all

  • Cmdrjan

    Charter school troll.

  • Cmdrjan

    Charter school troll.  Did Shel and you spend much time drafting your very similar posts?

  • Cmdrjan

    OOPS – that’s ‘Shelby’, not ‘Shel’.

  • Rintinten

    I can only speak from my own experience. For years I worked in the construction field. I do odd jobs here and there on the side.  Through a real estate broker I was introduced to a member of management at a charter school.  Through that person I was introduced to another and another.  I paint, repairs doors, fences, windows, or whatever else is needed. I do this for $25 an hour.  I make no judgements on what the customer asks me to do, I just do it.  I see the inside of these schools, I see the quality of the buildings.  If there is a leaking pipe causing mold growth on a wall, I am told to spray some Kilz on it and paint over the water damaged drywall.  Should I notice an illegal junction box and point it out they say I will get an electrician, next time I am there the same problem exists.  These schools in my opinion do not care about the safety of the kids, only the bottom line.  Teachers I assume say nothing out of fear for losing employment. I no longer do work for these type of business owners.  I am secure enough now that I can pick and chose my customers. The kids I saw were nice enough the majority of them came from non-English speaking families, the teachers seemed to be of the same nationality thus allowing them to communicate with the teachers easier.  That has to account for something. Regardless of how you feel about this ECOT school it is about the kids and the parents making efforts to improve the education they are receiving.  Last thing I will say.  If you want to get an idea of ECOT go over to the old southland mall in Columbus, Ohio.  ECOT rents out 75% of that building.  It is a train wreck. If they care about the kids then improve the safety of that building, that way when people come in for whatever reason, potential clients (thats what they are) get a better feeling about the business.

  • Rintinten

    I can only speak from my own experience. For years I worked in the construction field. I do odd jobs here and there on the side.  Through a real estate broker I was introduced to a member of management at a charter school.  Through that person I was introduced to another and another.  I paint, repairs doors, fences, windows, or whatever else is needed. I do this for $25 an hour.  I make no judgements on what the customer asks me to do, I just do it.  I see the inside of these schools, I see the quality of the buildings.  If there is a leaking pipe causing mold growth on a wall, I am told to spray some Kilz on it and paint over the water damaged drywall.  Should I notice an illegal junction box and point it out they say I will get an electrician, next time I am there the same problem exists.  These schools in my opinion do not care about the safety of the kids, only the bottom line.  Teachers I assume say nothing out of fear for losing employment. I no longer do work for these type of business owners.  I am secure enough now that I can pick and chose my customers. The kids I saw were nice enough the majority of them came from non-English speaking families, the teachers seemed to be of the same nationality thus allowing them to communicate with the teachers easier.  That has to account for something. Regardless of how you feel about this ECOT school it is about the kids and the parents making efforts to improve the education they are receiving.  Last thing I will say.  If you want to get an idea of ECOT go over to the old southland mall in Columbus, Ohio.  ECOT rents out 75% of that building.  It is a train wreck. If they care about the kids then improve the safety of that building, that way when people come in for whatever reason, potential clients (thats what they are) get a better feeling about the business.

  • http://plunderbund.com Joseph

    Thank you for the great comment.  

    I’ve written about some of this ” tweaked grade, reduced assignments, or someone at home doing the work for them” a few months back: 

    http://www.plunderbund.com/2011/04/03/ohios-for-profit-charter-schools-make-great-businesses-crappy-educators/

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